Volume 59, #2 // April 2017

About CSSH
Comparative Studies in Society and History (CSSH) is a forum for new research and interpretation concerning problems of recurrent patterning and change in human societies through time and in the contemporary world. Now in its fifty-ninth year, CSSH sets up a working alliance among specialists in all branches of the social sciences and humanities. Review articles and discussions bring readers into touch with current findings and issues.

Current Issue
Issue 59-2 features essays under the following rubrics: Land and Labor Regimes; Visual Politics; National Emotions; History And Sociology: Conditions Of Interdisciplinarity.

More Thoughts on Resistance and Refusal: A Conversation with Sherry Ortner

In 1995, Sherry Ortner published an essay in CSSH that continues to attract readers today. “Resistance and the Problem of Ethnographic Refusal” (37/1: 173-193), explored a trend, emergent at the time, in which resistance-oriented scholars were abandoning fine-grained accounts of local, subaltern worlds for critical analysis of external, impinging powers: the empire, the state, the…

Under the Rubric: Land and Labor Regimes

CSSH has a longstanding tradition of juxtaposing essays for comparative effect. Our readers enjoy this ritual, but we often wonder what our authors think of it. Under the Rubric gives CSSH authors a chance to respond directly to each other’s work, drawing additional insight and inspiration from their arguments. Land and Labor Regimes TANIA LI,…

Kudos

Bjørn Thomassen (CSSH 53-4, 2012, “Notes towards an Anthropology of Political Revolutions“) has coauthored a new book (with Rosario Forlenza), Italian Modernities: Competing Narratives of Nationhood (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). The press website describes the book as follows: This book argues that Italy represents a privileged entry point into the comparative analysis of ideologies and experiences…

Things I’ve learned from working at CSSH, or How to Interact with a Top-Tier Academic Journal

Many CSSH editorial assistants are world-class ethnographers. In 2010, Laura Brown proved she was one of these gifted observers. As a teaching guide for her successors and as parting counsel to manuscript submitters (and reviewers) everywhere, she produced the following account of how things work at CSSH. Known in-house as “The Brown Rules,” it is…

Volume 58, #4 // October, 2016

Editorial Foreword
It was only two decades ago that scholars across multiple disciplines announced the demise of the nation-state, both empirically as the central institutional channel of power, and heuristically as an indispensable social science variable.s ago that scholars across multiple disciplines announced the demise of the nation-state, both empirically as the central institutional channel of power, and heuristically as an indispensable social science variable.